Evaluation of a pilot of requesting models

Results of an evaluation of a pilot of models for requesting organ and tissue donation in Australia

A public summary report with results of the national evaluation of a pilot of models for requesting organ and tissue donation in Australia was released on 16 October 2015.  The evaluation was conducted to assess the impact of the Family Donation Conversation (FDC) training on the way health professionals manage conversations with families when discussing organ and tissue donation, and to examine the impact of the FDC training and the collaborative requesting model on consent rates. 

The evaluation was conducted by the Australian Institute for Primary Care & Ageing (AIPCA) at La Trobe University for the Organ and Tissue Authority (OTA) and completed in 15 hospitals across Australia. It captured detailed information about the process in each case a potential donor was identified in participating hospitals during a 12 month period which resulted in 201 cases.

The evaluation made a number of conclusions regarding:

  • the structure, content and conduct of organ and tissue donation requesting practice observed;
  • staff training and FDC experience;
  • staff perceptions of the families’ experience;
  • the association between FDC practice and consent rates; and
  • the local context for organ and tissue donation requesting.

A key finding of the evaluation was that there was a significant association between completion of the FDC training and a higher consent rate. 

The presence of at least one FDC-trained professional in the FDC was associated with a higher consent rate: 69.3% compared with 45.2% where no FDC-trained professional was present.

Having an FDC-trained professional lead the conversation was associated with higher consent rates of:

  • 74.5% when the professional leading the conversation was FDC-trained and not the treating clinical specialist;
  • 54.8% when the professional leading the conversation was FDC-trained and was the treating clinical specialist; and
  • 45.2% when the professional leading the conversation was not FDC-trained and was the treating clinical specialist.

The report also includes information on the relationship between the conduct and content of the donation conversation with families and consent rates, and staff assessment of the value of FDC training in equipping them to plan and conduct family donation conversations.

Read a summary of the report - Results of an evaluation of a pilot of models for requesting organ and tissue donation in Australia.

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